Little Print Shop

http://www.sdahomeschools.org/little-print-shop/

I let go today.

It’s a good thing! I needed to trust my boys and see what they could do! I needed to, but always before I had assumed only was careful enough, so I took on tasks that required precision, and did it all myself, while they looked on, wishing they could help.

But, a little voice (you know the One) whispered that I would run myself ragged trying to do it alone, between school subjects. Many hands make light work!

It took me time, but I did listen. Here’s what we’re up to!

Our Sabbath School chose a noble project this year of trying to raise enough money to rescue a girl from trafficking in India. We were told this would cost somewhere between $1,500 and $2,000! We have 12 kids. How could we accomplish this great task? Of course we began to brainstorm about a project.

Among the ideas, one that somehow popped into my brain was the idea to print and sell the prayer cards that I had just made for myself, after listening to a neat talk on 3ABN. Here’s the talk. I had no idea if anyone would want them, but since I was excited about my own cards, I thought that maybe someone else would like them too!

After contacting the speaker and getting permission to print and sell her cards for our mission project, we kind of waited to see if anyone would want them. Well, we didn’t wait too long before we received a couple of requests. Then a couple more. When one lady ordered seven sets, though, and then several more requests came in, we knew we had more than something we could squeeze in the cracks of time between math and science. We suddenly had our own little ministry!

It’s funny, because from time to time, I have wished for something that we could do together, but could never really think of anything concrete. Now we can all be a part of the team; indeed, we all need to do our part, to make the thing work! Before we really knew what happened, we had requests for 20 sets of cards, plus what we needed to make for the Juniors to show people. So, 20 sets times 100 cards equals 2,000 cards, and that’s just the orders so far! It gets a little overwhelming thinking about that!

After thinking about it some, I realized that this would be a very good learning experience. We made a little assembly process, and each boy had a part to learn. At the beginning of the chain, my 11-year-old helped feed the colored paper into the printer to print the sheets out. Before long he was printing front and back sheets independently, and he loved his role! We had to choose 10 different colors of paper for the 10 different topics, which was easy enough; then a lady wanted pastels. We decided we would offer two options —brights or pastels — and soon noticed that the demand was about equal for both kinds.

Next came the laminating process, which my 14-year-old oversaw. He kept the sheets running through as fast as he could, which wasn’t exactly quick, just because our little laminator is rather pokey. Once laminated, the sheets had to be cut! My 12-year-old took this job over from me. This was a difficult thing for me to hand over, but he soon proved that he was competent and careful. Once the sets were bundled up into groups, my 11-year-old and 14-yr-old took turns punching holes, and then we put them onto rings.

This whole process sounds like it happens quickly, but, for us anyway, it takes quite a bit of time! Even with us working diligently, the enormity of the task just required a heavy time commitment.

But, I have learned a few things along the way, which is the whole point of our little business endeavor. One thing is that many hands on the job is a good thing. It was not difficult to interest my boys in the work, because it was hands-on, and they were an integral part of it! Contrast this with regular school work. The usefulness of the task just made it more agreeable. We still have to do school work, but the skills just in this project are very important. Categorizing, printing, planning and coordinating colors, precision in several areas, and staying on task were some that I noticed. In fact, staying on task with this was the biggest surprise to me, because I have a certain young’un who really has a hard time with focusing. I looked on amazed as he turned out to be the most focused of all, and didn’t want to quit!

Just to be more “schoolish,” I assigned the boys to write up a paper describing the whole process of the card-printing job. Again, I looked on in surprise when the boys cranked out decently detailed papers on the subject, when just last week and the week before and so on, their writing assignments practically had to be dragged out of them! It’s another testimony to relate-able and practical. It’s much easier to write about something you are interested in and know something about, as opposed to the last paper we tried to write!

So, long story coming to an end, I found that, once again, if we have something interesting and that allows our boys to “do something,” we just learn so much better! Frankly, I wonder if the boys even knew they were learning anything. But, if they are going to run their own businesses some day, or function at a job under someone else, learning skills like this will be a real benefit to them. The fact that through our work we are tangibly making strides to rescue a child from trafficking  makes it all the more practical and important!

If we can do a little home ministry/business, so can you!

As an update: this project got rolling, and before long, the kids REALLY HAD raised enough money to rescue a child from trafficking! Now, 3 months later, they are well on their way to a second rescue! What a victory for persevering!

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Tools Trump Toys!

 

A few weeks ago, my then-ten-year-old son sent me this email:

(I purposely did not correct his grammar and punctuation errors so that you could know it is authentic. We can work on those later.)

Hi, how are you doing? I am doing good. I want a bird (chickadee) cake for my birthday and strawberry ice cream. I  want to go swimming and roast hot dogs on the fire and have watermelon for lunch on my birthday.

Here is a list of present’s:
Drill
Drill bits
Saw
Nails
Screws
Garden tools
Clippers
Love, AJ

Well, my heart smiled, and I immediately sent it to Grandma so that she could share my enjoyment, as well as have a list of birthday suggestions. Then, I studied the list more and began to wonder, “Are these gifts normal?” Do most soon-to-be-11-year-olds wish for clippers, drills, and garden tools?

We have boys. Pretty much from the time they were able to recognize a saw, they used sticks to make pretend ones. You know how it goes: a simple stick can transform into a chainsaw, a sword, or a violin bow, just as quick as the imagination changes gears. I don’t say that this is unique to boys; they are just what I have to observe. I’ve known little girls to turn a cell phone into a pretend ultrasound probe and scan their daddy’s belly. Kids just make up pretend tools according to what they are exposed to, because they want to do “real things.” In fact, if you stop to watch little people, many of their games are attempts to copy what their adults do frequently.It’s no wonder, then, that in our family, when our oldest boy turned nine (a few years ago), he scrimped and saved his dollars to purchase a used lawnmower, so that he could be just like his daddy, who ran a lawn service. Sure, he liked playing with Legos like most boys, but he mostly saved those for the winter months, when he had to be cooped up inside anyway. He always had a desire to do something useful — build something, make something, or try to figure out how something worked. He led the way in the “Tools over Toys” philosophy that we have preferred since we began our family.

We have never been opposed to toys, but as children grow and multiply, so do their toys! I began to inwardly groan whenever holidays and birthdays rolled around, because really, children don’t need as many toys as they generally have. They are hard to keep organized, and easy to lose. Thankfully, our extended family has been very respectful in the types of toys shared. As time has gone on, and especially since we are gearing up for a move into smaller living quarters, I have seen our boys begin to evaluate more closely their possessions. Suddenly, we all have to prioritize, and only the most important items get to go along with us! I’ve seen many toys go out, and we have shifted to the new era of Big Boy Toys.

Big Boy Toys are those that men and boys alike appreciate: power tools, ratchet sets, etc. Once every three weeks or so, my boys will convince me to take them to Harbor Freight Tool Store. I’m afraid I go into that store like my husband would enter a Hobby Lobby — dragging my feet and groaning to myself. I set a timer; otherwise, we’d stay for hours! One reason I go is the very reason I hate to go — I know that a good percentage of what’s sold, or given away for free, in that store is going to be a disappointment. I hate to see good money used up on trifles, but once I’ve stated my opinion of the necessity of some of the freebies, I hold my tongue. Time does teach lessons here — those “free batteries” let you down just when you are getting ready to take that great shot of the eclipse; the “free” headlight really doesn’t provide enough light for your trail; and you can only use so many amazing grabbers! So, the lessons learned by purchasing or acquiring cheap stuff is a good one, better taught by experience than by parental advice. Our sons are slowly learning that there is quality to be found, but they may have to wait, pay more, or both, in order to find it.

Transitioning to real tools instead of toys will likely happen naturally, if the conditions in the home provide opportunities to learn to use them. A girl won’t desire her own rolling pin and apron if she never gets a chance to try out making cookies or looking through cookbooks. Boys who never get to see under a hood of a car will learn to assume someone else should fix the car instead of jumping right in there to see what’s wrong. But, I was very glad last week with my just-turned-11-year old! We were in town, and my father asked us to drive a homeless man to my parent’s house where we would eat together. Dad and our other son jumped into Dad’s truck and took off! Well, my car would not start, and the man in our car was elderly and had crippled hands, so I knew he was dependent on us. Our youngest hopped out, flipped open the hood, and proceeded to tap the battery; then when that didn’t work, he dug out the jumper cables from the trunk and helped the other man who stopped to help us. I felt very proud that our sons had learned some basic lessons (informally) under the hood. It’s because Daddy has allowed them to watch and help that they feel confident to at least try some basic repairs.

In our homeschools, one goal is to graduate our children with the knowledge they will need to do practical work once they leave our supervision. So, practical training is vital to their success in life. There are many recommendations in the Spirit of Prophecy about practical training. We have been reading through the book Education, and the chapter on “Manual Training” is very useful for this topic. A few nuggets that I dug up are these:

“When children reach a suitable age, they should be provided with tools. If their work is made interesting, they will be found apt pupils in the use of tools. If the father is a carpenter, he should give his boys lessons in house building, ever bringing into his instruction lessons from the Bible, the words of Scripture in which the Lord compares human beings to His building,” Child Guidance, p. 356.

“Your means could not be used to better advantage than in providing a workshop furnished with tools for your boys, and equal facilities for your girls. They can be taught to love labor,” Healthful Living, p.137.1.

“While attending school the youth should have an opportunity for learning the use of tools. Under the guidance of experienced workmen, carpenters who are apt to teach, patient, and kind, the students themselves should erect buildings on the school grounds and make needed improvements, thus by practical lessons learning how to build economically. The students should also be trained to manage all the different kinds of work connected with printing, such as typesetting, presswork, and book binding, together with tentmaking and other useful lines of work. Small fruits should be planted, and vegetables and flowers cultivated, and this work the lady students may be called out of doors to do. Thus, while exercising brain, bone, and muscle, they will also be gaining a knowledge of practical life,” 6 Testimonies, p.176.

This sentiment is voiced from several individuals that have experience in educating children. One is Dr. Raymond Moore. He recommends a balanced approach to education, with three areas comprising most of the student’s education: work, service, and study, in equal proportions. Here is his counsel on what will help a child to learn practical skills:

“Instead of toys, give them tools (kitchen, shop, yard or desk), encyclopedias, magazines; use libraries, etc. Don’t be shocked at their interests, even if they are guns or motorcycles! From these they can learn chemistry and physics (internal combustion motors), economics, math, history, geography, languages, cultures, and manual skills (at local repair shops or in home businesses). Girls are usually a year or so ahead of boys, at least until late teens.

“The ‘antennae’ sprouting from the brains of most students are blocked by mass-education’s cookie-cutter substitutes for life that destroy creativity. Kids come out uniform-sized cookies, or sausages.”

You may read more about this tried and true approach to education at the Moore Foundation.

As I was gathering my thoughts about this post, I stumbled across an excellent article here (No Greater Joy).  It has been years since I have read any of the material from No Greater Joy, but in this article, Michael Pearl shares his perspective on why many young people, boys in particular, drift away to an aimless life. He believes that, “Boys have a greater need to explore, invent, achieve something objective, conquer, and compete. They have a need to be meaningfully engaged in pursuits that yield objective results, like rebuilding automobiles, painting a house, cutting firewood, building something that others will admire. They are little kings looking to build a kingdom and furnish it. Idleness (including entertainment) breeds self-loathing and wanderlust.” And also, “The child who is not needed as part of the team will gravitate toward loyalties outside the family.” In other words, our children absolutely need to not just feel needed, they need to know they are needed! It reminds me of another page from Child Guidance that says we need to “let children feel that they are part of the family firm” (p. 126).

A couple of years ago now, my husband did a mulch job for some neighbors. The boys sometimes go along to help out, but this time they didn’t. But, for some reason the gentleman gave my husband a little extra money, designated for the boys, so that they could each purchase a little something. The funny thing was that, when we trekked out to Wal-Mart to buy their gift, they each chose a garden tool! I drove them by the neighbor’s house for them to show him what they had chosen with their money, and imagine his surprise when three young boys marched up to the front door with rake and shovels! He exclaimed, “What’s this? Are you coming to dig a hole?” They simply told him that the tools were what they had chosen with his money. He really did scratch his head over that one, but several years later, when he needed someone to cover his lawn for a few weeks, he gave the job to the boys with the garden tools!

So…we can encourage our kids in the areas that they have an interest, and if we help them to build up their stash of tools appropriate for the task, they will not only be better equipped, but they will also sense that they have our support.

For (not just) boys, the list is almost endless:

  • Garden tools
  • Saws, clippers, and pruners, pocket knives
  • Toolbox tools: hammers,wrenches, screwdrivers, tape measures, drills
  • Power tools
  • Photography equipment
  • Science tools: microscopes, telescopes, magnifying glasses, ID books
  • Rock tumblers, gold pans, metal detectors
  • Knot trying and climbing books, rope
  • Bike fixing supplies: tubes, wrenches, tire tools

For (not just) girls, all of the above, plus:

  • Kitchen essentials: small baking pans, smaller sized oven mitts, aprons, kid cookbooks
  • Knitting needles, crochet hooks, and yarn (Knitting looms are fun and an easy way to make hats and scarves.)
  • Sewing machine and fabric, simple patterns (Boys like this too! My husband always wanted a sewing machine until someone told him they were for girls. But…what about tailors?)
  • Hair cutting supplies
  • Books on wild edibles, compass

The list really could go on and on! I think the point is to get ourselves and our children into a mindset of learning useful skills, and to provide equipment and training so that they gain the confidence to pursue their interests.

Happy learning, and go find some tools!

p.s. The Lord tested me on this on the very next day after I wrote this article. We planned our “first day of school” for that day, only to find that my husband needed help on a project. I struggled, but realized we could be inside “doing school” with him needing help, or I could let the boys go help. I chose the latter, and what a blessing it was to see them working alongside Daddy — with their own tools! We can still maintain the balance of work/study/service. Some days are almost all books, and some are more heavy on the service or work. But, I would not trade the experience that they had working with Daddy — it’s real life, and he really did need them!

Resources:

  1. White, E.G. (1954) Child Guidance. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald.
  2. White, E.G. (1897) Healthful Living. Battle Creek, MI: Medical Missionary Board.
  3. White, E.G. (1901) Testimonies for the Church, Volume 6. Mountain View, CA: Pacific Press.

Source: Tools Trump Toys! – SDA Homeschool Families

simple. practical. timeless

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A couple of months ago, our homeschool changed focus to more of a practical preparedness approach. We are loosely using the Prepare and Pray curriculum, but as usual, life has kept us busy with different twists and turns, preventing a completely consistent use of Prepare and Pray, as it’s written, anyway. The focus is still there.

With our Pathfinder Club, the boys have learned many useful skills, like knots, camping skills, and  rescue, just to name a few.  I am extremely thankful that we have a good club!  Since that’s finished for the year, the boys really have purposed to learn more of these practical skills this Summer, in the form of more honor patches.  Having a little incentive to motivate them sure makes a difference!

But last weekend, our whole family had the opportunity to participate in a really wonderful time of learning!  The whole focus of the five day camp meeting was Preparedness–with the focus being on the time, which we believe is soon, when things in our world will be very different from the way we are accustomed to.  The Bible calls it the Time of the End.  Now, we believe that Jesus is our only Refuge in the storm that is coming.  Yet, if we know that we can learn skills that will help us to better deal with what we know is coming, when our modern conveniences won’t be able to be depended upon, then we are wise to consider taking notice.

The name of the  camp meeting was Total Preparedness Camp, and was put on by Jim and Becky Buller, of Preparing to Stand Ministries.  We attended in Liberty, KY, but they hold these camps in different locations throughout the country!

Our family was only able to stay for 2 1/2 days of the time, but in those days we learned so much!  Daily, we learned from the Bible about people like Noah, who moved with fear and built an ark because he believed that God would do what He said He would do.  Morning and evening time were the Bible study times.  The middle part of each day was for learning practical skills–very hands-on!

I was amazed at how engaged our boys became in the topics being presented, even if they’d already been exposed to it before!  By the end of our time, they were actually volunteering to hurry up and clean up our camper so they could attend EVERY meeting possible!  This does not always happen with my boys.

When we came back, we compiled a list of some of the skills we focused on.  I’m sure we missed some, but here are the bulk of them:  Sabbath, we learned about finding directions in the wild, and participated in an activity illustrating that even those of us who think we have a good sense of direction just don’t.  We can’t trust our innate sense of direction, because in almost every case, it led the person off track.  Interestingly, in children, it was more accurate.  On Sabbath, we also learned how to make a solar compass, took a wild edibles hike, learned how to identify flint rock, then how to use that flint with steel, to start a fire.  Our youngest son came back from the hike with pockets bulging and pants sagging under the weight of his newly-found flint collection.  We also discussed survival priorities that first day.

The next day was designated as No Buy, No, Sell day.  In essence, we got to imagine that, like the Bible says , there will be a time, when, if we are loyal to God, we won’t be able to buy or sell.  So, in a very small way, we just practiced what it would be like to live without  some of of our modern conveniences, and used no electricity, stoves, or fossil fuel–basically nothing that we couldn’t readily obtain from the land as far as heat and power.  I was a little nervous about this, but in reality, we only practiced this for a portion of that day, in the daylight hours, and nobody really felt deprived.  We really need to practice this one on a more lengthy time period to get a better feel for it. But, it was a good place to start, since few people live like this anymore.

We started by harvesting vegetables out of the garden.  This is not a big deal for some people, but there were some others attending who really had never dug a potato or pulled a carrot from the ground!  And they were so happy to get their hands in the dirt and do this simple task!  Their excitement made it fun for all of the rest of us as we were reminded that pulling food out of the ground really is amazing!

Next, part of the group experienced cutting down a tree with no power tools–only hand-powered tools!  I didn’t hear any complaints but I’m sure it was hard work.  We then used that wood for our fire, because lunch had to cook over it!  If I had to cook every meal over an open fire, I’d not get much else done!  It takes forever!  The “Camp Kitchen Crew”, of which I was a part, all worked in harmony–each preparing some tasty dish to share.  Our family just purchased a cast iron Dutch oven so that we could learn something new.  I’m so glad we did!  As I chopped potatoes and onions, I looked around for our sweet potatoes.  Those got left at home.  Almost as soon as I realized that, someone came along calling out, “Does anyone need any sweet potatoes?”  “Yep, right here!”  Before long, another brother brought corn, asking the same thing, so I added that to our pot, remembering the story of Stone Soup.

Soon, we had three Dutch ovens all stacked up on top of each other, with good things inside cooking away!  Someone had a rocket stove, so we got to try how that worked as one family cooked hominy, and ours gave a good effort at black beans.  We decided that we need more practice on the rocket stove, and some adjustments are probably needed.  But, we got beans and hominy for supper.

How could we squeeze so much into just one day?  I don’t know how, but I do know we packed a lot into that day.  We got to observe an energetic young man till/disc the ground using horse and mules for power.  It’s funny how this is the way things used to be done for centuries, but to us, it is really almost a spectacle to see people work!   I will say that he did it barefoot, which caused me a few shudders inside.  Also, we learned about shelters and saw how to make a simple shelter from a tarp.  We still need to practice that one.  I think they probably did that when we left.  But we have plans to construct our tarp shelter soon and sleep outside in it.  The boys do, anyway.

The last day we stayed, it poured down rain!  We were supposed to take a survival hike, but things got switched around and we did more inside learning.  We learned how to prioritize in a survival situation, how to make useful tools out of natural materials, and what to take in your backpack.  We learned how to make the charred cloth that is helpful for starting flint/steel fires and how to make a water filter.  We had a good lesson on how to sharpen knives and other blades, and the boys had the opportunity to make cordage (rope) out of natural grass-type material.   It’s funny that they learned this, because we recently had to learn how to make rope, but we didn’t really know how to do it from natural materials.

Listing all of these “skills” doesn’t give a full picture of our experience at this camp meeting.  There was just something about being together with like-minded people that was an encouragement.  We came from all over, but I believe that God brought us together.  I can only speak for our family, but we really feel blessed to have had the chance to attend.

Something happened after we came back from the Campmeeting. All three boys have suddenly revived their interest in their little gardens!  With no prompting by me, they are all outside, where they’ve been for the past hour, digging away, and scouring our closets for more seeds to plant!  I’m not going to discourage our eldest, who just informed me that he planted a row of pinto beans (from the store). I don’t know if they’ll grow or not, but whatever happens, he will get a cause-effect lesson, so it will be a win. 👍🏻

The boys took notes, and I’ll just share a little excerpt, because I believe it sums up the reason we feel like it’s good to keep learning new skills.

Most old people made their own food, but the people in this time don’t.  You need to grow your own food.

I’d encourage anyone who has the chance to check out one of these preparedness camps.  Here’s a link to the site where you can find out more about them and that also contains plenty of helpful information about survival and practical living

http://www.preparingtostand.org/

Keep learning!

 

Pray and Prepare…a new journey 

We needed a change in our homeschool. Interest and attention seemed to be waning, which, I realize is kind of normal; after all, how many boys would admit that they LOVE school?  Not mine, anyway. They look at it as something to be endured, until they get to go ride bikes and play around outside. Still…I do have a desire that they enjoy themselves while learning, and I knew this was possible.

I made the somewhat radical decision to totally change up our curriculum, mid-year!  It may be a crazy experiment, but I believe that whatever happens, we will learn from our time along this new trail.

Speaking of trails, that’s really what our new curriculum is all about–blazing trails, wilderness survival, and practical approaches to everyday life that will help us to meet whatever challenges the future holds. The best preparation, as Christians, is to have our hiding place in Jesus, who is the only one who can protect us ultimately. Yet there are prudent measures families can take to deal with emergencies and unexpected life events.  Taking a first-aid kit along while hiking, anticipating tornadoes and making some basic preparations, learning how to care for illnesses from what grows around us–all of these things are really common sense skills, but we don’t always give them much attention.

So, the name of the curriculum is Pray and Prepare.  You can get it here: Prepare and Pray.  It’s not very well-know, I’m finding, and so as I’ve tried to do some research on the curriculum, I haven’t found too many users of it.  That’s why I decided to share what we end up doing with it. Because it is a unit study approach, many subjects overlap, and every home using it will have its own unique way of carrying out the projects. It’s very much pick and choose, and since we are just getting started, I am having to figure it out as we go.

This is our third week into it, with one whole week housing a sick boy.  So, there have been some bumps in the road. I think the biggest bump so far is figuring out how much to try to tackle each day. Those first days, although they had fun activities, stretched out way too long into the afternoon, which was wearying. I’d been told to not try to tackle every project listed, but I tend to want to, and that leads to fatigue and mental overload. So, a couple projects per week is all we can really tackle, and concentrate on the basics the other times.

Our first week projects included making a bear bag, which is what you’d do while camping to store your food away from bears. I read the description of how to make it to the boys, and was content with that information. That’s my tendency. But I felt a prick of conscience telling me that I got this guide so that we could learn hands-on, not just read it & regurgitate it.  So, we toon the mesh onion bag, and packed it with food, got the tape measure, and had to go outside to hunt up the right size tree, then measure and hang the thing.  I can tell you which method the boys and I will remember–the one we did, not read!!  Lesson for me, who would often rather sit on the sofa than get up and go out!  Maybe this curriculum is more for me!!!

In our wild edible portion (you get to pick your own plants research), we studied the pine tree and mullein. We ended up learning so much about the pine tree and all it has to offer in a survival situation, that we needed the whole week instead of one day.  We actually harvested the inner bark if the pine tree and cooked it–we kind of liked it!  I don’t think we will be frying pine bark in coconut oil in a survival situation, unless we happen to be stranded on a tropical island, but it was good learning.

Also from the pine tree, we made pine needle tea, which we all agreed tasted more like medicine than Celestial Seasonings. And the tea left our mouths feelin dry, like when you eat an unripe persimmon. Not really a big hit here. But, it does contain five times more vitamin C than an orange, so don’t cross it off your survival list!!

Pine sap is useful in many ways, one of which is making a torch!!  As soon as my youngest two heard that, they shot off outside to cut a big stick and harvest some pine pitch!!  I think their eagerness probably led to some skipped steps in their torch-making process, because I never did see a very long time-burning flame, but I believe that understood the process.  Do remember pine pitch for any wounds or cuts while hiking, because it has soothing and healing , as well as antimicrobial properties, and makes a pretty good glue for your cut!

Mullein, we learned, had many useful properties too. The boys remember the “Cowboy Toilet Paper”!  We finally found some right out back today, so I harvested some for tea. While the tea is fairly pleasant, those tiny hairs from the leaves do not feel good, so I would think long and hard before I’d use the mullein for TP.  I need to mention that to the boys.  Not everything has to be experienced!

Not directly from the P&P, we have been studying camping skills also. So, yesterday, youngest camper showed how he could build and start a fire with just one (almost) match. The windy day did not help his one match, but it did ignite with just one!  Also, he needed to bake bread on a stick!  He gave a valiant attempt, but since the biscuit dough was gluten-free, it just would not stick to that stick!!  So…we got biscuits the ordinary way!!

Middle Man Bro build us a nice fork thing for hanging pots on over the fire. We haven’t made any soup on that fire yet, but one day we will try.

For writing projects so far, the boys have had to create posters detailing the nine survival priorities, which is very practical. Don’t worry about food if you don’t have shelter or water available, etc. The next week was a small research project on ducks. Is week we chose our own writing project out of our Bible lesson on Naaman. We are focusing on Little Maid and the preparation her parents obviously gave her before she was carried away into captivity.  That was a sobering thought for me–we are preparing our children for an unknown future.  That’s where the Pray really comes in.

I’m leaving out lots, but for now will just hit on some of the hands-on projects, because that’s what we are trying to fit more of into our learning.

Today we took another side trip because the boys are working in a Seed honor for Pathfinders. They had to collect thirty different kinds of seeds!  That would be much easier during a different part  of the year, but even on this dreary and cold day, we traipsed around and found enough.  No, we don’t have black beans growing in our back yard;  they were allowed to choose ten from household and seed packets. I was surprised but not surprised to see which of our boys really don’t into this project–my Middle Man!  He loved it! Sometimes I am at a loss as to what will motivate him–turns out it’s Nature!  The Little Man seemed to enjoy it too–they worked together!  Big Bro–my most motivated usually, did his part, but it was not really his cup of tea.

Here are a few shots from these first weeks (Unit one).  So far so good.  The major lesson is to not over-do the projects.

Organizing the seeds

Mullein from out back!

 

The cooking fork

Freshly harvested inner pine bark

Thirty-plus seeds!

Toasting the bark!

One match fire

Inner pine bark that we toasted

Up a tree harvesting pine bark

 

What’s cooking, Boys?

Mondays…so many of them tend to be similar–a challenge!

We needed a more active approach to math today, and a lesson in practical usefulness too.

Now, I recently said that I am not a recipe sharer too much, and, although it’s true that it’s because there are already a bazillion other recipe websites, I realized that it’s mostly true because I just don’t use recipes all that often.  I like recipes, but usually look at the ones I like, scan the basic ingredients, and sort of wing it.  This can be good or disastrous.  I’ve made some flops, but usually the food turns out alright.  Just maybe not the same twice!

Well, I have one boy who is following after my pattern, without the background of experience in cooking to know which things to guestimate on, and which items you’d better get exact.  Like baking powder, or yeast.  That could be ugly if we eyeballed those items.  He thinks that I just sort of make up recipes, and sometimes I guess I do, but most often, I take something that I’ve made so many times that I just don’t have to look at the card anymore, and make it from memory.  I’ve kind of had to figure out the gluten-free thing as I went, but looked at it from a science perspective–you need such and such number of dry ingredients, such and such amount of binder, something oily, something wet, and so on.  I don’t just throw in items willy nilly.  But, to my son, I’m sure it seems like I do.  😉

Now, I wanted the boys to have a chance in the kitchen.  They really love that kind of thing.  I thought it would be them helping me make lunch, but then thought, “Why not let them do it themselves?”  I know why I don’t usually let them–I’m afraid to let three eager beavers loose in the kitchen.  Could be scary!

I did it anyway, and the pictures will show that they all three had a really wonderful time, and took their tasks quite seriously.  I wrote out three different recipes, and turned them loose!  Below are the results!

Incidentally, the soup recipe I got from someone who liked a blog post of mine, and when I went to her blogpage, I found it. We did end up liking it really well.  http://aalifemoment.com/2015/01/18/creamy-tomato-soup/

We had to tweak it a bit since we didn’t have fresh tomatoes, but it was yummy anyway!  Very easy, too!

So…Speedy made the soup, and I think he learned that chopping up vegetables small really would have made the soup cook faster–but that’s why we are doing this–so we can learn those kinds of things!  You should have seen his “chopped” onions–quite large chunks, but the blender did its job and the soup ended up smooth!

Chatterbox made the muffins–gluten free and simple.  He is very careful in his measurements–the exact opposite of Speedy.  We tried a GF flour from Costso, and it made the whole process very simple.  It really was just like baking with regular flour, because they had all the binders added to the flour.

Bam-Bam made the hummus.  Even though he makes a big show about hating garbanzos, he loved making this hummus!  He, also, measured exactly.  His hummus turned out great!

So…although the kitchen looked like a big food explosion, everyone had a great time, took hold of his task and did it up well.  I just stayed out of the way, and tried to clean up here and there.  We had a few carrot missiles that ended up in the wrong place, but if that’s all of the fall-out from the day, then I’d count it a success.

A delicious success.

Here’s what it looked like:

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