Homeschool Seasons, and Why Sometimes you have to “Fake it til you make it!”

I wrote this post for another homeschool site that I blog on. I ran across it again today and decided to share it here, as a record of my journey, and of God’s faithfulness through trials and times that appear dark. The following was my experience with homeschooling at the end of 2017.

As a blog writer for this group, and for my personal blog, I have never before experienced the writer’s block that I am currently going through.

I am a week late on my deadline, and not for unconcern. I do not take my commitment to this group lightly. Through the past month, I have frequently had ideas for blog articles buzzing around in my mind, but when the time came for me to harness them, they just didn’t seem to fit. So, I am going to write from my heart, and pray that what I share will connect with someone out there.

Sometimes on a homeschool page like this one, we present information, and it seems like we are some sort of experts on the homeschooling process. Just forget about that portrayal. I can assure you that when we share anything, it is because we have tried many ideas and finally found one that has worked, or that we hope will work out. We might not share the umpteen flops, failures, and moments of sheer desperation that led us to our “instant successes.”

This school year I prayed for opportunities for our boys to learn practical skills. I meant that prayer. But, I had no idea how that would play out. Even that is an understatement. My husband and I made plans for apprenticeship opportunities, in controlled settings, at predictable times, in mind for learning skills. I would drop off our eldest for a couple of hours with a mechanic, and go pick him up, or something like that. The details hadn’t materialized, but we had plans. Beware of plans. Of course, we have to make plans, but just be careful about holding too tightly to them.

You see, we had other plans too, plans which involved property, dabbling in homesteading, and clearing land. We had plans to ease into a “build-as-you-can” project, and slowly work our way into our off-grid Home-Sweet-Home. Through some unanticipated life turns, we suddenly realized that we would need to crank up the schedule of land preparation, and that “easing into it” would change to “get it in gear!”

The high-gear stage began when we needed to rent a piece of heavy machinery to help with the clearing. When you’re paying for a big machine, everything begins to revolve around efficiency so that you don’t waste rental hours. That’s sort of when homeschool began also to revolve around whatever we needed to do to “get ‘er done!”  Early hours, late nights, and a picnic every day became the norm, since the property is about an hour away from our home. We all got a sudden immersion into the ins and outs of putting in septic lines, rock characteristics, soil types, and so on.

This process has been exciting in many ways. After all, we prayed that God would lead us to a piece of country property, and He did. When we chose this property, we knew full well that to make it work, we would have to put in lots of work, and even that seemed like part of the romantic charm of carving out our own homestead, like in the olden days. We were all on board, eager, and gung-ho! Every day was a new challenge, but we knew that we would figure it out. Our boys suddenly had the chance to jump in and learn some practical skills as the oldest two ran the transit for the leveling of the septic lines, and everyone got to help install the field line components. Progress was clicking along pretty well, considering all of the rock we encountered. We got our garden and greenhouse site prepared, and holes dug for our orchard — 3x3x3 so we can plant them the Ellen White Method, that the angel showed her in a dream.  I remember standing up at the top of our property in the future garden, and thrilling as I looked over the wooded hills, just feeling blessed. It was my mountaintop time, when faith was easy.

Life is not all mountaintops, though, and as my husband had to go out of town for work, the full responsibility suddenly rested on me. This was fine, with what we initially had planned to accomplish. Then, additional projects popped up that needed immediate decisions.  Every day another challenge came that eventually left my head spinning, as I tried to make important decisions on the fly, figure out yet another DIY project, purchase supplies, and just keep life running. Let me say that I totally get the fast food concept now. I’m afraid Taco Bell became a more regular part of our lives, and home-cooked meals have become more a rarity than our regular fare.

This season has honestly been the most stressful season of homeschool that we have gone through, and are currently involved in. When I have more projects on my plate than I know how to deal with, I short circuit, and then we certainly experience the trickle-down effect through the ranks. As challenge after challenge has hit, I have seen myself at close to my worst. I have analyzed what we should and could be doing differently, but just keep coming back to the fact that life right now is not our ideal situation, but we have to keep plugging away. I have cried many times, overwhelmed with what new thing we must handle. And, I am finding that it is not always the biggest challenges that I crumble under, but the little annoyances — the loud noises when my mind screams for some silence, and the mental load of trying to understand multiple projects simultaneously.

In the last months, we have stacked up the projects, leaving little time for quiet reflection. As the mental pressures pile up, I found myself unable to process much more mentally, so I have been so grateful that my boys know how to cook. When I hear, “Mom, what’s for breakfast?” before I even have a chance to get the cobwebs out of my head, I am thankful when they just make it happen so that I don’t have to make another decision. My mind has been stuffed with septic line assembly, dump truck rental, fruit tree placement, hole size, distance and diameter, house site clearing, basement excavation, footer dimensions, root cellar placement and size, finances, sick child, phone that quit making calls, floor plans, mud and rain, driveway excavation, packing, and employee coordination. Then our sink and countertop failed us, and we found out just how poor we are at “figuring out” DIY.  Did I mention school? Allll this without Dad! Literally, when our month of focused excavation was completed, our eldest asked me what we were going to do the next day. I replied, “School.” “Only school?” he asked. “Yes.” He let out an audible sigh of relief at “only school,” and I realized that we all were just completely exhausted, physically and mentally.

The more overwhelmed I felt, the more time I noticed myself turning to Facebook. I realized it was/is an escape for me, and a natural way to “interact” while my husband and I have had decreased communication because of distance. I enjoy catching up, but I realized that my already overwhelmed mind didn’t need more material to think about. I have consciously been watching my time on FB this last week or more, and I see that it helps me. My mind can only take on so much before it reaches saturation. And then, when things are already challenging, the temptation to compare your life to the lives portrayed by others is quite high. This can compound feelings of inadequacy and frustration. But, what we need to realize is that on any journey, there are shadows and rainbows. Facebook posts tend to showcase the rainbows, and maybe it’s because we all need to cling to those moments where something actually does happen right. We as homeschoolers especially need to keep this in mind.

During this time, I have admittedly fallen behind in reading other blogs in our group. The other day, I randomly (I thought), while weary, feeling knocked down and dragged under the bus, stumbled upon this post on our blog. It’s the only blog post I have read in over a month. I don’t even know how I got through it, I was that tired, but somehow, some bells started to go off in my head. I particularly appreciated the links that were shared to Dr. Caroline Leaf’s materials. I began to listen to some of the messages, and I saw so clearly how, even though I legitimately have real challenges in our situation right now, I don’t have to drown under them. Jesus offers help, and it is with my cooperation, especially in my thought life. Wow. There is abundant material about the brain and how our thoughts form connections that contribute to our health, both mentally and physically. Truly, we are what we think. I haven’t read part two of the blog about our thoughts, but I will soon be doing so.

I feel like that reminder about choosing my thoughts has helped me. It has made me more aware of what I say since it reacts on me and others, like my children, reinforcing the positive or negative. And, I have seen how much the Lord really wants to help me to have a victory, not a defeat.

I will say that old habits are those that surface without our effort, and so much so in this area of what we say. I am literally praying often that God will give me a kind word, because when I feel overwhelmed, my natural reaction is negativity. Barbara O’Neill, a favorite speaker of mine, says that we must “fake it ’til we make it,” and that this indeed is a spiritual principle. This is a very helpful talk about the laws that govern our minds. I highly recommend it, and I need to go back and re-listen to it too!

Don’t misunderstand the Fake It ‘Til You Make It outlook. This does not mean to pretend your worries away, expecting that they will just vanish. Instead, it means choosing what we tell ourselves about what we are going through, and choosing to turn to beneficial sources like Bible promises to get our mental dialogue pointed in a positive direction. The Bible says, “Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on thee, because he trusteth in Thee,” Isaiah 26:3. This strongly suggests a partnership between us and the Lord. He promises us peace, but first we choose to train our minds on Him, His power, His ability, His goodness towards us. He is able to help us in every emergency.

Cheezburger Image 6084583680

Another talk that I appreciated is this talk by Maria Neblett, called The Language of Encouragement. She speaks so honestly about her struggles, and I really can relate to what she shared. But, she also shows us how to strive for victory and change the course of our homes. This talk I have listened to a couple of times, but really need to go back over it until I can truly make it my experience.

I hope that my ramblings have not been too random. God is good. He is real, and He is here for us. Satan wants to weigh us down and defeat us in any way that he can. We do have a part to play to cooperate with our Saviour, even if we have to “Fake it ’til we make it!”

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simple. practical. timeless

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A couple of months ago, our homeschool changed focus to more of a practical preparedness approach. We are loosely using the Prepare and Pray curriculum, but as usual, life has kept us busy with different twists and turns, preventing a completely consistent use of Prepare and Pray, as it’s written, anyway. The focus is still there.

With our Pathfinder Club, the boys have learned many useful skills, like knots, camping skills, and  rescue, just to name a few.  I am extremely thankful that we have a good club!  Since that’s finished for the year, the boys really have purposed to learn more of these practical skills this Summer, in the form of more honor patches.  Having a little incentive to motivate them sure makes a difference!

But last weekend, our whole family had the opportunity to participate in a really wonderful time of learning!  The whole focus of the five day camp meeting was Preparedness–with the focus being on the time, which we believe is soon, when things in our world will be very different from the way we are accustomed to.  The Bible calls it the Time of the End.  Now, we believe that Jesus is our only Refuge in the storm that is coming.  Yet, if we know that we can learn skills that will help us to better deal with what we know is coming, when our modern conveniences won’t be able to be depended upon, then we are wise to consider taking notice.

The name of the  camp meeting was Total Preparedness Camp, and was put on by Jim and Becky Buller, of Preparing to Stand Ministries.  We attended in Liberty, KY, but they hold these camps in different locations throughout the country!

Our family was only able to stay for 2 1/2 days of the time, but in those days we learned so much!  Daily, we learned from the Bible about people like Noah, who moved with fear and built an ark because he believed that God would do what He said He would do.  Morning and evening time were the Bible study times.  The middle part of each day was for learning practical skills–very hands-on!

I was amazed at how engaged our boys became in the topics being presented, even if they’d already been exposed to it before!  By the end of our time, they were actually volunteering to hurry up and clean up our camper so they could attend EVERY meeting possible!  This does not always happen with my boys.

When we came back, we compiled a list of some of the skills we focused on.  I’m sure we missed some, but here are the bulk of them:  Sabbath, we learned about finding directions in the wild, and participated in an activity illustrating that even those of us who think we have a good sense of direction just don’t.  We can’t trust our innate sense of direction, because in almost every case, it led the person off track.  Interestingly, in children, it was more accurate.  On Sabbath, we also learned how to make a solar compass, took a wild edibles hike, learned how to identify flint rock, then how to use that flint with steel, to start a fire.  Our youngest son came back from the hike with pockets bulging and pants sagging under the weight of his newly-found flint collection.  We also discussed survival priorities that first day.

The next day was designated as No Buy, No, Sell day.  In essence, we got to imagine that, like the Bible says , there will be a time, when, if we are loyal to God, we won’t be able to buy or sell.  So, in a very small way, we just practiced what it would be like to live without  some of of our modern conveniences, and used no electricity, stoves, or fossil fuel–basically nothing that we couldn’t readily obtain from the land as far as heat and power.  I was a little nervous about this, but in reality, we only practiced this for a portion of that day, in the daylight hours, and nobody really felt deprived.  We really need to practice this one on a more lengthy time period to get a better feel for it. But, it was a good place to start, since few people live like this anymore.

We started by harvesting vegetables out of the garden.  This is not a big deal for some people, but there were some others attending who really had never dug a potato or pulled a carrot from the ground!  And they were so happy to get their hands in the dirt and do this simple task!  Their excitement made it fun for all of the rest of us as we were reminded that pulling food out of the ground really is amazing!

Next, part of the group experienced cutting down a tree with no power tools–only hand-powered tools!  I didn’t hear any complaints but I’m sure it was hard work.  We then used that wood for our fire, because lunch had to cook over it!  If I had to cook every meal over an open fire, I’d not get much else done!  It takes forever!  The “Camp Kitchen Crew”, of which I was a part, all worked in harmony–each preparing some tasty dish to share.  Our family just purchased a cast iron Dutch oven so that we could learn something new.  I’m so glad we did!  As I chopped potatoes and onions, I looked around for our sweet potatoes.  Those got left at home.  Almost as soon as I realized that, someone came along calling out, “Does anyone need any sweet potatoes?”  “Yep, right here!”  Before long, another brother brought corn, asking the same thing, so I added that to our pot, remembering the story of Stone Soup.

Soon, we had three Dutch ovens all stacked up on top of each other, with good things inside cooking away!  Someone had a rocket stove, so we got to try how that worked as one family cooked hominy, and ours gave a good effort at black beans.  We decided that we need more practice on the rocket stove, and some adjustments are probably needed.  But, we got beans and hominy for supper.

How could we squeeze so much into just one day?  I don’t know how, but I do know we packed a lot into that day.  We got to observe an energetic young man till/disc the ground using horse and mules for power.  It’s funny how this is the way things used to be done for centuries, but to us, it is really almost a spectacle to see people work!   I will say that he did it barefoot, which caused me a few shudders inside.  Also, we learned about shelters and saw how to make a simple shelter from a tarp.  We still need to practice that one.  I think they probably did that when we left.  But we have plans to construct our tarp shelter soon and sleep outside in it.  The boys do, anyway.

The last day we stayed, it poured down rain!  We were supposed to take a survival hike, but things got switched around and we did more inside learning.  We learned how to prioritize in a survival situation, how to make useful tools out of natural materials, and what to take in your backpack.  We learned how to make the charred cloth that is helpful for starting flint/steel fires and how to make a water filter.  We had a good lesson on how to sharpen knives and other blades, and the boys had the opportunity to make cordage (rope) out of natural grass-type material.   It’s funny that they learned this, because we recently had to learn how to make rope, but we didn’t really know how to do it from natural materials.

Listing all of these “skills” doesn’t give a full picture of our experience at this camp meeting.  There was just something about being together with like-minded people that was an encouragement.  We came from all over, but I believe that God brought us together.  I can only speak for our family, but we really feel blessed to have had the chance to attend.

Something happened after we came back from the Campmeeting. All three boys have suddenly revived their interest in their little gardens!  With no prompting by me, they are all outside, where they’ve been for the past hour, digging away, and scouring our closets for more seeds to plant!  I’m not going to discourage our eldest, who just informed me that he planted a row of pinto beans (from the store). I don’t know if they’ll grow or not, but whatever happens, he will get a cause-effect lesson, so it will be a win. 👍🏻

The boys took notes, and I’ll just share a little excerpt, because I believe it sums up the reason we feel like it’s good to keep learning new skills.

Most old people made their own food, but the people in this time don’t.  You need to grow your own food.

I’d encourage anyone who has the chance to check out one of these preparedness camps.  Here’s a link to the site where you can find out more about them and that also contains plenty of helpful information about survival and practical living

http://www.preparingtostand.org/

Keep learning!

 

Pray and Prepare…a new journey 

We needed a change in our homeschool. Interest and attention seemed to be waning, which, I realize is kind of normal; after all, how many boys would admit that they LOVE school?  Not mine, anyway. They look at it as something to be endured, until they get to go ride bikes and play around outside. Still…I do have a desire that they enjoy themselves while learning, and I knew this was possible.

I made the somewhat radical decision to totally change up our curriculum, mid-year!  It may be a crazy experiment, but I believe that whatever happens, we will learn from our time along this new trail.

Speaking of trails, that’s really what our new curriculum is all about–blazing trails, wilderness survival, and practical approaches to everyday life that will help us to meet whatever challenges the future holds. The best preparation, as Christians, is to have our hiding place in Jesus, who is the only one who can protect us ultimately. Yet there are prudent measures families can take to deal with emergencies and unexpected life events.  Taking a first-aid kit along while hiking, anticipating tornadoes and making some basic preparations, learning how to care for illnesses from what grows around us–all of these things are really common sense skills, but we don’t always give them much attention.

So, the name of the curriculum is Pray and Prepare.  You can get it here: Prepare and Pray.  It’s not very well-know, I’m finding, and so as I’ve tried to do some research on the curriculum, I haven’t found too many users of it.  That’s why I decided to share what we end up doing with it. Because it is a unit study approach, many subjects overlap, and every home using it will have its own unique way of carrying out the projects. It’s very much pick and choose, and since we are just getting started, I am having to figure it out as we go.

This is our third week into it, with one whole week housing a sick boy.  So, there have been some bumps in the road. I think the biggest bump so far is figuring out how much to try to tackle each day. Those first days, although they had fun activities, stretched out way too long into the afternoon, which was wearying. I’d been told to not try to tackle every project listed, but I tend to want to, and that leads to fatigue and mental overload. So, a couple projects per week is all we can really tackle, and concentrate on the basics the other times.

Our first week projects included making a bear bag, which is what you’d do while camping to store your food away from bears. I read the description of how to make it to the boys, and was content with that information. That’s my tendency. But I felt a prick of conscience telling me that I got this guide so that we could learn hands-on, not just read it & regurgitate it.  So, we toon the mesh onion bag, and packed it with food, got the tape measure, and had to go outside to hunt up the right size tree, then measure and hang the thing.  I can tell you which method the boys and I will remember–the one we did, not read!!  Lesson for me, who would often rather sit on the sofa than get up and go out!  Maybe this curriculum is more for me!!!

In our wild edible portion (you get to pick your own plants research), we studied the pine tree and mullein. We ended up learning so much about the pine tree and all it has to offer in a survival situation, that we needed the whole week instead of one day.  We actually harvested the inner bark if the pine tree and cooked it–we kind of liked it!  I don’t think we will be frying pine bark in coconut oil in a survival situation, unless we happen to be stranded on a tropical island, but it was good learning.

Also from the pine tree, we made pine needle tea, which we all agreed tasted more like medicine than Celestial Seasonings. And the tea left our mouths feelin dry, like when you eat an unripe persimmon. Not really a big hit here. But, it does contain five times more vitamin C than an orange, so don’t cross it off your survival list!!

Pine sap is useful in many ways, one of which is making a torch!!  As soon as my youngest two heard that, they shot off outside to cut a big stick and harvest some pine pitch!!  I think their eagerness probably led to some skipped steps in their torch-making process, because I never did see a very long time-burning flame, but I believe that understood the process.  Do remember pine pitch for any wounds or cuts while hiking, because it has soothing and healing , as well as antimicrobial properties, and makes a pretty good glue for your cut!

Mullein, we learned, had many useful properties too. The boys remember the “Cowboy Toilet Paper”!  We finally found some right out back today, so I harvested some for tea. While the tea is fairly pleasant, those tiny hairs from the leaves do not feel good, so I would think long and hard before I’d use the mullein for TP.  I need to mention that to the boys.  Not everything has to be experienced!

Not directly from the P&P, we have been studying camping skills also. So, yesterday, youngest camper showed how he could build and start a fire with just one (almost) match. The windy day did not help his one match, but it did ignite with just one!  Also, he needed to bake bread on a stick!  He gave a valiant attempt, but since the biscuit dough was gluten-free, it just would not stick to that stick!!  So…we got biscuits the ordinary way!!

Middle Man Bro build us a nice fork thing for hanging pots on over the fire. We haven’t made any soup on that fire yet, but one day we will try.

For writing projects so far, the boys have had to create posters detailing the nine survival priorities, which is very practical. Don’t worry about food if you don’t have shelter or water available, etc. The next week was a small research project on ducks. Is week we chose our own writing project out of our Bible lesson on Naaman. We are focusing on Little Maid and the preparation her parents obviously gave her before she was carried away into captivity.  That was a sobering thought for me–we are preparing our children for an unknown future.  That’s where the Pray really comes in.

I’m leaving out lots, but for now will just hit on some of the hands-on projects, because that’s what we are trying to fit more of into our learning.

Today we took another side trip because the boys are working in a Seed honor for Pathfinders. They had to collect thirty different kinds of seeds!  That would be much easier during a different part  of the year, but even on this dreary and cold day, we traipsed around and found enough.  No, we don’t have black beans growing in our back yard;  they were allowed to choose ten from household and seed packets. I was surprised but not surprised to see which of our boys really don’t into this project–my Middle Man!  He loved it! Sometimes I am at a loss as to what will motivate him–turns out it’s Nature!  The Little Man seemed to enjoy it too–they worked together!  Big Bro–my most motivated usually, did his part, but it was not really his cup of tea.

Here are a few shots from these first weeks (Unit one).  So far so good.  The major lesson is to not over-do the projects.

Organizing the seeds

Mullein from out back!

 

The cooking fork

Freshly harvested inner pine bark

Thirty-plus seeds!

Toasting the bark!

One match fire

Inner pine bark that we toasted

Up a tree harvesting pine bark

 

When Mama gets a bit sleep deprived

I wanted to keep this here for my own memory’s sake

It’s just a little song I wrote and sent to my family after a night of a strange sickness that stopped by.

Here’s a little song that HAS BECOME FAMOUS overnight. In our house, anyway.
To the tune of Deck the Halls…

Here we go:

Hark, the sound of children puking
Falalalala lalalala
Just when mommy’s started sleeping
Falalalala lalalala
First the one, and then his brother
Falala lalalalalala
All over the sheets and covers
FALALALALA LALALALA!!!!!!!!

All done now, go back to bed
Falalalala lalalala
Ease your pillow under your head
Falalalala lalalala
Close your eyes, and warm your toesies (skip the next Falalalala….)
What’s that now–it’s a third go-around!!
Jump up quick and pinch your nosies
FALALALALALALALA!!!

Now the worst is surely over.
Falalalalalalalala
Snuggle up, and move the cat over
Falalalalalalalala
Start to dream,
What’s that–more hurling sounds!
One more time, trudge to the bathroom
FALALALALALALALALA

Lest you think that I am joking
Falalalalalalalala
Come on now and do your own poking
Falalalalalalalala
Into my great, big,huge laundry pile
Filled with ducks, and pillows and monkeys
FALALALALALALALALA!!!

😜

More verses could be added, but I’ve already indulged my creative talents enough for today. You should know that everybody’s “fine”. Both boys involved in the aforementioned ditty declared themselves “fine” immediately before and after the said episodes. One boy even looked up from his puking and said, “Mom, I don’t know why I’m doing this–I feel just normal.”
I would have felt just normal too, if I’d have been curled up in my bed sleeping. 😌 But, since I spent my night dashing through the halls (oooh, I think I feel another song coming on), you get to experience the joy of me on sleep deprivation, responding to the songs that pop into my tired little brain. 🎶

Tee hee.
Have a good day. I’m doing laundry.

 

How to Make a (Neat) Charcoal Poultice (Reblog)

How To Make A (Neat) Charcoal Poultice

Almost exactly one year ago, on my other blog, I posted this instructional.  That was probably my most important blog post, in terms of posts that we would like to refer people back to.  For that reason, I am posting it here, so that anyone can freely access the recipe and method.

Here goes:

I do not normally like to do “how-to” blogs for several reasons.

  1. I think it’s sort of silly to post twenty pictures of how I made my apple pie, etc., when you probably already know how to.  🙂
  2. I figure that the web already has enough how-to posts out there, and so why waste my time in repeating info that other people are already showing?
  3. I don’t like to take the time to show, step by step, how to do things.  I’d rather just show the finished product and let you take the steps needed to get there, as long as it’s pretty obvious.
  4. I don’t feel like I am an authority in most areas, so don’t want to present myself as an expert, offering advice.

With that said, there are some times when I do recognize that you need a step-by-step instructional, if it’s something new or different.  So, although you will not see many of this type of instructionals from me, I do want to share this one.

It’s for how to make a charcoal poultice.  That’s right, poultice.  So…what is that?!?  By definition, a poultice is:

1poul·tice

noun \ˈpōl-təs\

: a soft, usually heated substance that is spread on cloth and then placed on the skin to heal a sore or reduce pain

So…there are many different types of poultices, for many different purposes.  The one I’m focusing on today is the one made from activated charcoal.  It is used on many types of wounds and inflammatory conditions and infections.    If you have any type of skin itching, pain, insect sting/bite (including spider bites), swelling, infection under or on the skin,or  wound infection, a charcoal poultice may do wonders to help, since charcoal works by adsorbing (sort of like “soaking up” toxins).

DISCLAIMER:  I AM A MOM.  I USE NATURAL REMEDIES IN OUR FAMILY.  DO NOT TAKE THIS AS MEDICAL INSTRUCTION OR ADVICE.  🙂  Just want to be clear.

I do not believe in reinventing the wheel.  So much research has been done on the effectiveness of activated charcoal, that I would not be without it in our home.  I refer you to this website to learn all about charcoal and its many uses and advantages.  http://www.charcoalremedies.com   At that website you will find the reasons why charcoal works, and why it’s good to try.

I can see many reasons to learn simple home remedies.  I can help my family with simple ailments if I educate myself, and hopefully, we can help others as we learn.   Of all of the home remedies, I believe that learning about the power of charcoal is one of the most important, because anyone can use it, you can even learn to make it (which I would like to do).  I hope that you do check out the above website (not mine, and I don’t have any affiliation with them; I simply go there to learn).

Still, many people are hesitant to use charcoal topically, because it is so messy.  It’s messy to work with, mix up, and for many years, when I would make a poultice (flax based, which does work well, just messy), I would find that the black slimy substance had oozed to the sides of the dressing and made a big mess in the bed or on the clothing.  And charcoal does stain!!   I still believed in it, but for the mess, didn’t always reach for it with great joy.  :-/

But, recently, some friends of mine, who own a health food store, gave us a pre-made charcoal poultice.  We didn’t actually have a need for it at that time, but she told me to freeze it and it would keep nicely.  I put it into the freezer and pretty much forgot about it until I needed a poultice last week.  I remembered the frozen one, and defrosted it, and I found that way that this poultice was made was SO NICE to use!  It was not messy at all–in fact, I could literally cut off pieces from the large poultice  appropriate to the area I needed to cover, and the poultice DID NOT STICK to the wound or the skin, which made it amazing to use.

So, I am sharing the method and recipe, and I hope that this will encourage someone who may have tried charcoal in the past, or someone who never even thought of using it, to give it a try.

The Method:

MIX together carefully (so as not to puff it up in your face)

  •  1/2 cup activated charcoal powder
  • 1/2 cup ground psyllium husk powder

Then add slowly while stirring

  • 2 1/2 cups warm water

Mix until all of the liquid is absorbed and the mixture looks like a quivering ball of black goop.  It will actually look like play dough, but will be more shiny and gel-like.  If it is the correct consistency, when you knead it into a ball, not much of the mixture will stick to your hands at all.  If it is too wet, it’s kind of tricky to get more powder to work into the ball, but it can be done if you’re patient and just keep kneading it like bread.  It would be better to add the water slowly and not add any more if the ball reaches the correct consistency before you’ve added all of the water.

Next, you place your ball on waxed paper or plastic wrap, cover with another layer, and roll it out like a pie crust.  It should be about 1/4 inch thick or thicker so that it holds its shape.  This will roll out to a large area, at least 12″x18″.
You may use the whole poultice as it is on a very large area (abdomen, back) or cut it into smaller pieces to fit your need.  Then you may roll it like a jelly roll, seal it into a plastic bag, and store in the refrigerator for a week, or place in the freezer to store longer.
This is a very clean poultice and can be peeled off when you are done with it.  It really does not stick to the skin, doesn’t ooze, and is very handy.
My notes–when I made the recipe above and took the pictures, I had a little help in measuring.  Ours turned out a tad stickier than it should have; I attribute it to a generous measuring of the water.  When I rolled it out, it still felt like it needed to be drier.  And it left some residue on my hands.  So, I added 1 T more of both charcoal and psyllium, and that did the trick.  So, measure carefully, mix the powders well first, or the water will not all absorb, and check your consistency.  It should be able to hold its shape when cut, and not flop around.  It should be slightly moist on your hands but not leave them with gel.  You can kind of shape it somewhat (squish it into shape).
I place the poultice directly onto the affected area, cover with plastic wrap, and if it’s a limb, wrap with an ace bandage.  If the skin is broken, you may place a thin piece of paper towel or cloth between the skin and the poultice to avoid the tatooing effect that charcoal sometimes leaves.  However, I have found that with this recipe, the black residue is negligible; I do not think it would leave a tatoo, but it never hurts to take precautions.
Try it and see what you think!
PS–since I originally posted this, I have had many, many opportunities to use this recipe and share it.  This may look a little complicated, but it really whips up very quickly.
Share, share, share!
If you know someone who is skeptical, just make a little batch and give it to them to keep until a need arises.  You can cut the recipe to any size needed, by just retaining the ratio of one part charcoal, one part psyllium husk, and five parts water.  I’ve made tiny batches like with just 1 T of charcoal, and mixed it in a tiny little container to use with band aids and bug bites or little sores.  🙂

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